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Central Appalachian Spruce Restoration Initiative (CASRI)

The Central Appalachian Spruce Restoration Initiative (CASRI) is a partnership of diverse interests with a common goal of restoring historic red spruce-northern hardwood ecosystems across the high elevation landscapes of Central Appalachia. It is comprised of private, state, federal, and non-governmental organizations which recognize the importance of this ecosystem for its ecological, aesthetic, recreational, economic, and cultural values.

Red spruce and red spruce-northern hard-wood forests once dominated the highest elevations of West Virginia, covering more than 500,000 acres. Extensive logging in the late 1800s and early 1900s reduced much of the mature forest in the Appalachians, including the red spruce-dominated stands. Today only about 29,600 acres of high elevation red spruce forests remain in the State. 2016 CASRI Year-End Report Major Higlights 2016 proved to be yet another year of impressive accomplishments for CASRI: Over 1,798 acres of high-elevation lands placed on a trajectory to develop into functioning red spruce ecosystems, bringing our restoration total to over 5,794 acres.

2016 CASRI Year-End Report

Major Higlights

2016 proved to be another extremely productive and fruitful year for CASRI:

  • Over 1,798 acres of high-elevation lands placed on a trajectory to develop into functioning red spruce ecosystems, bringing our restoration total to over 5,794 acres.
  • 51,850 red spruce seedlings and 14,760 native plants planted on high-priority conservation and restoration sites.
  • 530 acres of early successional habitat created.
  • 538 acres of red spruce forest protected from damage by livestock use.
  • Over 544 acres of non-native invasive species treated in high-elevation red spruce systems.
  • Over 300 volunteers dedicated their time to restoring red spruce habitat and planted just shy of 10,000 trees

Read the full 2016 Accomplishments Report [.pdf]
Read a one page summary of the 2016 Accomplishments [.pdf]

 

Restoring WV Spruce Means Cleaner Air for the Region

Restoring highland Appalachian spruce forests could help reduce the amount of carbon in the atmosphere.All healthy forests take CO2 out of the air and trap carbon in the trees and the ground.But according to soil scientist Stephanie Connolly who works in the Monongahela National Forest, Spruce trees do this very efficiently.

Listen to the story here

   

Climate Smart Restoration of Appalachian Forests

As0 the climate changes, and our forests are affected, the need to reclaim impacted areas and restore native species becomes more important than ever.The U.S Forest Service's Monongahela National Forest is at the forefront of not only forests restoration, but also helping those landscapes adapt to climate change. Read more..

   

Volunteer Spruce Planting at the Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge

September 17, 2016 9AM

On september  17th the refuge is inviting volunteers ...

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Who are we?

This website has been established and is being managed by the West Virginia Highlands Conservancy to support the work of the Central Appalachian Spruce Restoration Initiative (CASRI).

CASRI is a partnership of diverse interests with a common goal of restoring historic red spruce-northern hardwood ecosystems across the high elevation landscapes of Central Appalachia. It is comprised of private, state, federal, and non-governmental organizations who share a recognition of the importance of this ecosystem.

Contact Us

For more information, and volunteer opportunities, please contact :

Julie Fosbender

Partnership coordinator

US Forest Service

Monongahela National Forest

jfosbender@fs.fed.us

P: 304-636-1800

f: 304-637-0582

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